Tag Archives: Cee’s Which Way Challenge

Carlisle to Lanercost Abbey

Most people “do” this 14 or so mile stretch in one day. The walking is pretty easy and even I could have done that (although it would have been a stretch), but we took two: Carlisle to Crosby-on-Eden, then Crosby-on_Eden to Lanercost Abbey.

We did this in order to backtrack a bit and spend the morning at the Tullie House Museum in Carlisle. This was a very worthwhile stop because we learned quite a bit about how to recognize the wall and the earthworks near it when un-excavated-which is most of the way. It made the walk into a sort of scavenger’s hunt.

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On this stretch you start out walking along the Eden River in Carlisle, the main charm of this stretch is the wildflowers along the way.

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It is a nice walk through Cumbrian countryside. The tower in the picture below is a folly, not an ancient fort.

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The weather was okay until we got to Crosby-on-Eden, then the wind came up. Overnight it really blew, and the next day was blustery–good English weather with lots of atmosphere. It was in the stretch between Crosby-on-Eden and Lanercost that you start to see the signs of the earthworks and un-excavated wall. The only parts of the wall itself that you see are the stones re-purposed in churches, manor houses, etc along the way.

The end of that section, Lanercost Abbey, a lot of the stones for the Abbey were initially part of Hadrian’s wall.

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Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge

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Solway Firth to Carlisle City

Since life is moving fast and my ability to process the pictures from our last trip is not, I’m hoping to, at least on and off, work through our experiences walking the English National Hadrian’s Wall Trail day-by-day. Maybe life will slow down or I’ll speed up…but I’m not banking on it. Walking the wall was a major accomplishment for me, I am not well balanced or athletic, so I feel a need to spend some time reflecting on it.

This small gallery shows the variety of walkways that make up the national trail.

On our second day of walking Hadrian’s Wall Walk was about 9 miles from Boustead Hill through Burgh-by-sands (pronounced Bruff-by-sands) and other smaller villages, then along the Eden River into the city of Carlisle, we walked along roads (both paved and dirt), through cow pastures, beside a river and on narrow nettle and blackberry lined walk ways.

Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge

Follow that acorn!

Yesterday we touched down after a 23 day trip to England. The centerpiece of our trip was to walk the Hadrian’s Wall National Trail from Bowness-on-Solway to Wallsend, on the outskirts of Newcastle. We finished that walk a week ago today (officially it is 84 miles, but I can’t really brag-we did it over 12 days and had our luggage transported).

The National Trail is marked, well marked, by an acorn symbol.

Here are some pictures for Cee’s Which Way from the first day, walking along Solway Firth.

Setting out

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(I have so many pictures of my husband’s back that I have it as a key word in Lightroom!).

The road along Solway Firth is prone to seasonal flooding. In several spots they have signs to let motorists know how deep the water will be so they know if it is safe to proceed.

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Our first acorn (or at least the first one I noticed).

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Ducks go that way. (Actually it means that there is a wildlife refuge, but they use the same format on signs to show pedestrians and cyclists which way to go).

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Seaways

A somewhat different take for Cee’s Which Way Challenge this week. Last Friday I froze myself watching and taking pictures of a unique ship passing along the seaway of Puget Sound. This is a set of new cranes heading for the Port of Tacoma on a specially modified ship.

These cranes are very large, for unloading the new Panamax container ships. You can get a sense of how big they are as they pass by the Alki lighthouse and the ferries.

A walk in a park

I just came across these pictures from a couple of years ago. In Wiefang (Shandong Province) while visiting my son I made use of the time while he was working to wander around the city. In several spots they had parks between the streets that made a pleasant way to get around. A little longer but much quieter than walking along the busy streets.

Cee’s Which Way Challenge

Which way to the view?

The pups and I walk the same route most mornings, except when it is slicker weather. There is a spot along the way that we refer to as the “hump on 47th” where there are views out to the Olympic Mountains, when they are “out”. It is steep, a bit over grown and slippery on all but the driest days. Here is the path to our viewpoint from different directions (and different weather):

The view varies from mildly spectacular to non-existent:

For Cee’s Which Way Challenge