Galleries

Fall in Shouguang-Fishing in the River

On the eastern edge of the main part of the city is the Mihe River. The area along the river is a big and quite lovely park.

As I approached the river for the first time I saw something I had not seen before: several vendors selling fishing poles, nets, and fish traps. Often in China one will see vendors, selling food, kites, pinwheels, balloons. Walking along the river there were lots of folks, even families out fishing.

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Forest/Graveyards

I come late to the Halloween Party. At some point I may find words to describe the chaos of the past few months…and catch up on reading all the great posts y’all did while I was AWL (OverWhelmed by Life).

Several folks I follow have posted for the creative JNW’s Halloween Challenge, this week two topics from the challenge: forest and cemetery, right beside each other, reminded me that I went to two pretty unusual cemeteries this past year.

Kong Lin

Kong Forest (Kong Lin) is actually the burial ground for the Kong (family name of Confusius) clan for many, many generations.* If you have any interest this is a very informative Wikipedia article about Confucius (and other Kongs to some extent). Almost all of these pictures were taken from the comfort of a motorized cart; by the time I had walked from the hotel to the entrance, then through the Kong Temple (Kong Miao) and Kong Mansion (with gardens) to the Kong Lin my feet felt like the bones were poking through, so I didn’t get off until we got to the big guy’s tomb. It’s a fascinating and very atmospheric place, I’d love to go back sometime and start with the “forest”.

Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires.

This was unique in my experience (I don’t know if it is unique in the world, but I found it fascinating and have never seen anything like it before). It isn’t a forest, but it is a city of the dead within the very alive city of Buenos Aires.

 

 

*Wikipedia notes that

Confucius’s family, the Kongs, have the longest recorded extant pedigree in the world today. The father-to-son family tree, now in its 83rd generation, has been recorded since the death of Confucius. According to the Confucius Genealogy Compilation Committee, he has 2 million known and registered descendants, and there are an estimated 3 million in all. Of these, several tens of thousands live outside of China.

Sky Aglow

Some pictures of sunrises and sunsets from home and away in response to the Daily Post Photo Challenge:Glow.

Garinish Garden Path

These were taken on a path through the lush gardens of Garinish, in Ireland.

Garinish is an island near the Ring of Kerry. For some reason (maybe because so many of the same plants we saw there are blooming right now) I’ve been thinking about it lately. It was a driving challenge to get there from where we were staying in Killarney, but the travel was through beautiful country and well worth the white knuckles through a few stretches. It’s not super well known.

Cee’s Which Way Challenge

Delta Analysis

Back when I worked as  stress analyst I did a lot of “delta analysis”. The basic system was in place, but things change: a part might be built of a different material, a particular mission might have higher loads than the initial predictions…The question we were answering is “is it still okay?”

There isn’t a  picture to go with that…but the beach where I spend a lot of time is also a delta for a creek. Over the years the silt has built up and the landscape and animals one sees have changed. One thing I find really cool is that every year the path of the creek through the delta shifts because of winter storms…so it is an example of both fast and slow changes, and yet when the tide is in it looks the same as ever.


Delta

Peach Blossom Village

We visited Peach Blossom Village–a rather lackluster tourist attraction in Yichang, Hubei Province, China–at the end of our cruise through the three gorges in April. It was a drippy, grey day (maybe it wouldn’t have felt so lacking in luster if the weather had been cheerier, and our views of Xiling Gorge had been clearer.

However, the flowers were pretty. The call these peach blossoms but our guide told us that the trees are ornamental and do not produce peaches that one would eat.